Speaking up helps break the stigma of mental health.

Tell your story. Be part of the solution. Help others know that they are not alone.

  • Repeatedly placed into situations I had no control over, I felt powerless.

  • In middle school a friend I knew in elementary school committed suicide in his parent’s bedroom. He was 14.

  • My depression began at the age of 13....After many years of struggle, I finally realized and accepted that I have a disease and this disease requires help. I have a passion for life again.

  • The smallest amount of light coming forth from those who have walked before me brought grace. It is with that grace that I can be grateful for my child’s illness and the unexpected blessings that accompany it.

  • This conversation has provided the tools and information I need to know more about this illness.

  • It is sad and frustrating to not be able to give your child all of the help they need due to family court/legal systems that are not trained to serve children with mental health problems.

  • I began to notice the changes in my best friend as we grew older. As these symptoms of depression began to manifest, it was very clear that my friend had a mental illness.

  • I have been a volunteer with Clarity for the last 4 years and this placement was my 1st experience with mental illness in children. When I signed up, I was nervous and wondered if I could handle a position that was sure to be challenging.

  • I found myself struggling on my own. I couldn’t see a reason in living anymore. I suffered from depression and started making a suicide plan.

  • My child’s mental illness made me a better person.

  • I work with children who have been abused. They were targets because they have mental illnesses.

  • My cousin committed suicide last year because of a lot of things we had been facing.

  • I was depressed and I wanted to die to get away from the abuse I was living with at home.

  • It broke my heart to see my 2 year old grandson traumatized.

  • When we adopted our son he had been affected negatively by his prior experiences and we saw how traumatized he had been.

  • Working with children in the juvenile system has opened my eyes to mental health and how many people, especially kids, are affected.

  • I deal with the mental illness of my child every day. There are good days and bad days, but each is a conscience effort to battle the bad and appreciate the good.

  • I always sensed there was something “off.”

  • I am a single mom of 6. Three of my children were adopted. Two of the children have mental health issues. It is so hard to find people willing to accept my children in spite of their disorders. Just another hurdle. This too shall pass!

  • He pulled out a knife in our home and was going to kill his family and himself. I had no idea what my call to 911 would result in, but two angels dressed in SAPD uniforms showed up. I am grateful they knew what to do and how to help my son.

  • My brother was a chronic schizophrenic most of his life. Our life was filled with stress, but also with love.

  • I’ve done a lot of advocating for my daughters, especially to obtain proper medical and education services that support their mental health. We have to be the advocates for our children; we have to be their voice!

  • My daughters struggled in silence, but eventually opened up to me and got the help they needed.

  • I have PTSD. I would not talk about it much, only in little bits or privately if I felt safe. And then people were making me feel bad about this, telling me to be quiet...

  • We took her and discovered she as clinically depressed and was self harming, self medicating, being bullied at school and struggling with the tragic loss of a close friend...

  • We got hit head on by a drunk driver. My 7 year old now thinks I'm going to get killed by a drunk driver. We're getting help

  • It is important to realize that the entire family is impacted and therefore needs emotional care... I know there is hope. I have seen miracles happen in the most desperate cases and want others to know that a life worth living is possible.

  • My daughter who is 13 has overcome three major crises within the past year...

  • This is the first time I had a 3rd grader with a mental illness. I always give him a tight hug, hoping it will give him the encouragement he needs for the day.

  • The disease has destroyed us financially and mentally. But, every day is a new day and we strive for normalcy...

  • You are not your disorder, never let it hold you down. And remember, recovery is one of the hardest things one can ever do, but you're doing it or you're about to start to. There will always be help from someone, just reach out.

  • My brother is not 100 percent changed but his obstacles are no longer his identity. They are attributes that have made him stronger and unique...

  • The positives outweigh the negatives in so many of us who struggle with a loved one who has a disability or mental illness...

  • As a teacher, I was honored to be loved by many...my story to share is about "Andrew".

  • There is a mother and son that come into the shop I work in. The son has autism and the mother is the most patient and kind woman.

  • I helped raise 3 daughters who each had some type of mental disorder.

  • Growing up in an unhealthy mental environment was very challenging.

  • My son is smart and very funny. From a young age, he has had problems focusing and always in trouble in school.

  • As an educator and school counselor, I have seen the stigma towards children's mental health in patients, teachers, and society.

  • I received a phone call, when my child was in first grade, that the class had to evacuate and that my daughter had injured other children and that was the first moment....

  • When we finally broke down and pleaded for help when she was 5, we got the diagnosis that would change her life and ours forever...

  • The good days are worth fighting for and worth helping others fight for as well...

  • It wasn't just her illness that isolated her, it was a lack of education and acceptance for mental health...

  • Proper treatment saves lives; ignorance is a death sentence...

  • It hurts me to see and hear how he feels about life and the people around him, even his family...

  • As we stripped away the medications and a bright and tender boy surfaced, the neuromuscular symptoms resolved and his emotions came pouring out...

  • I will be her voice when she can't. I won't stop talking because there is a light at the end of the tunnel...

  • When I was in my undergrad, I worked with a family who has a son with autism. He was 7 at the time. I was hired to be his life coach and tutor.

  • We all go through struggles and having someone there for us makes us feel safer and more secure...

  • It is painful to see your child go through weeks of depression and seeing them lose control...With hope, I can keep going...

  • Mental illness has touched every aspect of my life, and will continue to do so for the rest of it....

  • I hope that someday my babies will live in a world that does not shun them because of their disease

  • I have ADHD, OCD, anxiety, depression and insomnia. Every morning I wake up and I hope that all of these diagnosis are gone, but they're still there.....

  • We need to break that stigma

  • I'm a therapist in training and have had children come into our clinic for various reasons

  • I'm a mother of my one, and only, daughter who began cutting at the age of 11 years old

  • All I really want to say is... Talk to someone. Learn about your situation. Do something please.

  • My daughter is 8 and has been bullied for a couple of years

  • I've watched it (children's mental illness) destroy coherent families

  • I have a few nieces that I believe suffer from depression

  • Normal is boring!

  • Diagnosed by M.H./M.R. Psychiatrist in Edinburg, Texas

Views expressed in the stories don’t necessarily reflect the views of One in Five Minds: While we encourage input, we are not responsible for materials posted by users of our websites. Comments or opinions expressed on our websites are those of their respective contributors only. The views expressed on our websites do not necessarily represent or reflect our view(s). We are not responsible for, and disclaim any liability in relation to, the comments/materials posted by contributors to our websites.